Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms

We were Caretakers

My wife, Irma, and I were caretakers managing a rental complex in the Toronto area in Ontario, Canada. While I was completing a management report in my office, I noticed the index finger on my right hand appeared to tremble while I wrote. I was 73 years of age. Little did I know that this was a harbinger of things that would bother me for the rest of my life!

We never know just when a medical problem will arise.

However; as time passed, I began to wonder about it. Over the years I had seen very few people with Parkinson’s but never really gave it a thought. I had another problem that drew my attention: both of my hips were telling me something was not right. Whenever I walked, pain was telling me that I had better see my doctor to find out the cause. He had some Xrays done and confirmed I had arthritis and one hip was more pronounced than the other. He told me the wait time was about 4 to 6 months and to let him know if I wanted to book an operation to replace the hip. I didn’t even think about my Parkinson’s disease symptoms as the hip pain was my immediate concern.

At the time, I didn’t connect that little tremor with Parkinson’s disease

We Make a Move

I met with my property manager and told him our situation. He didn’t want us to leave. He offered to hire a replacement while I went through the operation and convalescent period, but Irma is profoundly deaf and was recouping from a cornea transplant and was very uncomfortable with dealing with people due to these problems. She always was an amazing worker but left the task of dealing with people up to me. So the die was cast — we were moving to the west.

Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms

Every once in awhile I noticed my finger on my right hand next to the pinkie would quiver. Was it Parkinson’s disease? Just a thought, I guessed. But was it?

We sent our furniture via moving van and drove across Canada over a five- day period and Nancy and Jeff were there to greet us and show us around our/their beautiful new condo. It was spectacular and perfect for us. They would be living in another city about an hour away where Jeff was a successful caretaker responsible for a townhome and apartment building complex. Our daughter, Nancy, was employed with the Provincial government in a dental health program where she traveled to different locations in the area staging dental health clinics for newly arrived immigrants.

Our Medical Conditions Are Taken Care Of

We were able to find a family doctor quite quickly and he arranged a meeting for us with an orthopedic surgeon. The surgeon ordered X-rays and a couple of days later he advised me that it was arthritis that was causing the pain in my left hip. He had an opening the next week so I confirmed the appointment, my hip was replaced and I was walking pain free a few days later!

Every once in awhile I noticed my finger on my right hand next to the pinkie would quiver. Was it Parkinson’s disease? Just a thought, I guessed. But was it?

I met with our family doctor and asked about my Parkinson’s disease symptoms. He set up an appointment with a neurologist who, after a few tests, explained to me that I did have Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s Disease

There is no cure for Parkinson’s disease. I found out there was a support group active in our city and Irma and I joined with them. Over a period of time my symptoms increased and the doctor prescribed Levodopa. Fortunately, Irma and I have always enjoyed walking and as this activity is one that appears to help keep the symptoms at bay, we have followed a two-walk per day regimen since the diagnosis. Possibly, as a result, my symptoms have remained static for the past five years or so. I say, “possibly” as I cannot prove it is the walking or the Levodopa or a combination of both; but either way, I accept that something is working.

Other Activities That May Help

Parkinson’s disease symptoms can vary from a simple thing like my finger trembling to dyskinesia. This symptom is what affects people such as Muhammad Ali and Michael J Fox. Both of these gentlemen have suffered for many years but they never complained. Another symptom is a person may gradually lose the ability to speak. If a person has contracted PD one exercise that may be beneficial is practicing speaking loudly.

 

 

 

 

Kayaking-Great Fun On The Water

How Would You Answer These Questions?

Would you like to put some fun in your life? Are you enjoying the great outdoors? Have you ever considered kayaking? Have you seen kayakers out on the water in their little kayaks? Well we decided to see what it is all about and we have had a ball while doing so. If you think you may be too old to try this amazing sport, consider this: Irma and I are both 82 years young!

Kayaking; Having great fun on the water was what we saw when we put putted in our little gas-powered boat. We had our little boat for quite a while and thoroughly enjoyed our time on the water. Ours was a PORTA-BOAT and it was excellent. We had purchased a little outboard motor called a British Seagull. This was a bare bones little motor with no electronics except a spark-plug, no electric start, and no anything, just simply gas and a starter cord. Open the valve to the gas tank, set the choke, wrap the starter cord and give it a pull. It started every time for us and as we were retired, speed was not important. Top speed from the engine was minimal as it was rated at 3 HP.

Now there is very little exercise to be had from sitting in a nice little boat for a few hours. We began to take note of the many kayaks that were around the lakes. Once, while at a friend’s cottage, we had an opportunity to try out their kayaks. Getting into the kayak was no problem and they zipped along at a good speed. Getting out of the kayak was another thing. I tried this way and that but nothing made sense. I’m in pretty good condition but I finally ended up out of the kayak and ended up sitting in the water soaked from my belt to my shoes. I loved the idea of the kayak, so on to the next question.

How can Irma handle one?

We started to check around and came across inflatable kayaks. We found someone who had one for sale and since it was a two-person model we bought it. It handled nicely but the seats were very poor. Then we found one made by Sea Eagle. They were made in the USA and had a dealer in Burlington, WA so we ordered a tandem model and we liked it. The seats were not great but they were ok so we used the kayak a couple of times before we decided to buy two more of the deluxe seats and they have been fantastic.

Soon we were paddling around the lakes like professional kayakers. One advantage of the inflatable kayak is that it fits in the trunk of our little Honda Civic. All of the other gear fits in the trunk too: paddles, pumps, life jackets, rubber boots in the fall and old towels for drying off the kayak before returning it to the trunk.

Our Routine

 

When we arrive at the launching site we find an area near a boat launch. If there isn’t one we simply find an area where the bottom doesn’t drop off steeply. Once parked, Irma inflates the seats and unloads the paddles, life jackets and other gear and I lay out the kayak, and hook up the electric pump to the car. Ten minutes later we are ready to go. Many times we are parked near others with hard-shell kayaks who have just arrived. By the time they release their kayaks from the roof or back of their pickups, we are ready to go.

Seating Ourselves

The real beauty of our Sea Eagle inflatable kayak is the ease of getting in and out. Our seats fit into the kayak and when we sit in we sit right onto the seats. Step in and we are off and going. I sit in the stern and my seat is immovable. Once we are comfortable we are away for another day on the water.

Sea Eagle Warrantee

Sea Eagle kayaks come with a three-year guarantee and it came in handy as our kayak sprung a leak at a seam after about a year and a half. I called the company and they asked if I could take a short video of the area of the leak. I did and e-mailed it to them. A few minutes later they called me back and told us to trash it and the new replacement was on the way. I had a phone call three days later to come pick it up. You cannot beat great service!

Because we are both over 80 and Irma wears two expensive hearing aids, we kayak along the shore of the lakes we enjoy. We do not do white water but we do enjoy riding the wakes of the speed boats towing water-skiers as they race around the lakes. The kayak rides easily over the waves. We see fish, ducks, geese, herons and deer and the wildlife seem to almost ignore us and we get quite close to them.

 

The Decision To Move

Why We Were There

How does a person make a decision to move away from their home where they have lived for many years to a new area thousands of miles away? In fact, why would anyone do that?

The decision to move hit me as my wife and I were sitting down while having a lunch at the 6,800-foot level on Sheep Mountain in the Kluane National Park in the Yukon Territory of northwestern Canada. We were in one of the most beautiful areas in the world, surrounded by 100 Dall sheep who were wary of us but not really scared.

The scenery was unreal.

Huge mountains and valleys, to our west we could see the Kaskawulsh Glacier some 12 miles away. It is amazing as it was comprised of two glaciers that flowed together down valleys and combined to make one. To our north and below us was Kluane Lake. The few white, fluffy clouds in the blue sky reflected upon the greenish waters was a sight we will never forget; it was breathtaking! Across the valley from where we were, about 80 female sheep with their white coats stood out clearly as they fed on grasses here and there on the steep mountainside. About 100 yards over and a little higher from us were about 20 rams with their big, round horns just enjoying life in their domain.

Where We Came From

As we ate our lunch and took in this fabulous scenery, I couldn’t help but think of our lives back in Nova Scotia. It was a beautiful part of Canada but one very tough area to make a living. The economy had been stagnant and it was getting tougher to find steady work of any kind. Of course I was part of the problem as I did not have a trade except as a watch repairman and that career was done with the introduction of the digital watch. Our last job was planting trees on a reforestation project. We were working with young people in their teens and 20s and trying to keep up with them at the age of 56. The heat and rain along with the heavy ground cover was unbelievable but we got through the season and we were warned that there may not be any planting next year.

We Arrived For The Wedding

Once we finished planting we purchased our tickets to fly to the Yukon for the wedding. As soon as we arrived we noticed mostly everyone was working — the economy was vibrant. Whitehorse is the capital of the Yukon and is a city of 25,000 residents. It was bustling; people moving and getting along with their lives. As it was Friday afternoon, we couldn’t believe how many trucks with camping trailers were on the way out of town. Trucks towing trailers and boats, well-used motorhomes and every style of RV. Most vehicles had cracked windshields, almost like trademarks.

Although the highways are paved, they are seal-coated. This is done by spraying a coat of tar on top of the asphalt and then spreading a coat of fine crushed rock on top. This extends the life of the pavement but those small stones get picked up by the traffic and come flying back at your windshield like bullets and hit the windshield at a high velocity. It happens so often that nobody replaces their windshields until the glass is virtually ruined. For a small city, the movement was spectacular; It takes money and an active economy for this to happen. In comparison to where we had been living, it was a circus.

Haines Junction

We traveled in the borrowed car to a small village of Haines Junction. Other than the city of Whitehorse the population of the Yukon was only 5,000 and they are spread out very thinly as the Yukon Territory is huge. The St. Elias mountains there are really special. The highway is called the Alaska Highway that was built early in the Second World War.

A few miles ahead, we came to a place called Slims river. This is where, when the highway was being constructed by the American army, the group of workers working from the south towards the north met up with the group working from the north thus completing the connection of the highway.

Sheep Mountain

At Sheep Mountain in the Kluane National Park, there is an information station for visitors. The staff told us about a walk we could take to the top of the mountain where we could get the opportunity to see some sheep. We camped in our tent a couple of miles ahead. Getting to sleep was a challenge as this area of the Yukon is very near to the Arctic Circle and at this time of the year it stays bright as day except for at dusk for a couple of hours overnight.

After a good breakfast, we took our day packs and some food and headed up the mountain. After about two hours, we stopped for a break and this is where we found ourselves amid the splendour of this fabulous mountain.

A Decision is Reached

As we sat there, I began to contemplate our situation. We were at a dead end in our career and back home our economy was stagnant, a far cry from what the Yukon had to offer. What did we have to go back to? With these thoughts in mind, I told Irma I wanted to go back to our home, put it up for sale and come back by next June. Of course she thought I was out of my mind! Her thought was why move so far? Home was some 4,800 miles away. She could see the reasoning in us moving but not so far away. My argument was that once we load a truck with our belongings and head out it doesn’t really make any difference if we travel 10 miles or 8,000 miles; the only difference is the amount of gas we use. It was a decision we simply needed to make. I explained to her that we didn’t have a choice. We had to move and why not move to the vibrant economy of the Yukon?

Our Decision Was Made and We Continued Our Hike

Grizzly Bear With Cubs

We intended to do the loop down a creek and through the area where the folks at the visitor centre had warned us to be careful and make lots of noise as a female grizzly bear and her two cubs were seen recently. Our tea pot was a good noisemaker and if there were any bears around, we didn’t see them. It was quite hot and a long 10 hours of a hike. We took off our hiking boots and waded into the river to cool off our feet. What a shock! The water had been ice less than an hour or so ago. It was still extremely cold but refreshing.

We Travel Home

Our daughter’s wedding went off without a hitch and our visit came to an end. The minute we arrived home we contacted a real estate agent and listed the house.

The first item on the agenda was what we were going to do to make a living in the Yukon. Over the next couple of months we read up on the different things we could do. We found a machine for cleaning ceilings and walls. We figured that all of those people who were playing outdoors on the weekends would be anxious to have someone come into their homes to clean the ceilings and walls. Everyone smoked in those days so years of smoke on the walls and ceilings would be a great reason to have the cleaning done. The machine would cost $5,000 and we didn’t have a cent in savings. As a result of our employment in that last summer, we had qualified for unemployment insurance. We decided to save every penny we could by following a strict budget.

We Paid $500 for an Old Worn-Out Minivan

The windshield was broken by the owner when he accidently pushed a roll of flooring through it leaving a hole a foot in diameter. A part in the steering was worn out and while I drove the 90 miles to our home, we stuck to the back roads as the van was all over the road. After we arrived safely at home, I found a fellow who replaced the windshield with a used one and a friend found that a rubber gasket in the steering needed replacing. The 16-year-old vehicle would have to do the job, we hoped.

We rented out our home and moved to a cottage my brother owned for the winter. To make the van ready for the trip I built a roof rack on top. We went to a sign shop and purchased a few yards of vinyl. We made up graphics for the signs and stuck them on the sides of the van. We had purchased some magnetic sign material and made up a whole bunch of fridge magnets as calling cards.

On May 20 We Were Ready to Go

We had our bed and mattress on the roof. Inside we had our furniture and personal belongings and they were jammed to the rafters, as they say. We had our tent, sleeping bags and foam pads for sleeping, extra gas and camp supplies. We were on our way! We stopped in Ottawa for a day while we were taught how to use the machine and then hit the road again. Canada is one huge country and absolutely beautiful — great highways and good rest stops along the road.

We had a problem — the van was really struggling to get up the hills and I had to gear down to get to the top at times. Driving through Ontario was quite a challenge and we finally arrived in Winnipeg — we were halfway there. We went to a service garage and were told we had an engine with one cylinder not working. We decided to keep going as we didn’t have enough money to repair it.

My Only Concern was the Unknown

We were driving across the prairies where we could see for miles across flatlands. The van was running well but I knew that once we passed Edmonton, Alberta we would be going up hills and wondered if the old van would climb them!

We camped in provincial parks and ate our meals at rest stops where we could use our gas stove. We would stop once a day wherever we could find a grocery store and buy what we needed and keep it in our cooler.

The Alaska Highway is a very long drive with scarcely a home or village around. One day we arrived at a rest stop where we gassed up. We couldn’t believe it but the price of gas was .85 cents per liter. We thought that was awful as we had been paying 62 cents the whole trip, but we were told that the gas was high since all they had was aviation gas. That same litre in 2017 costs $1.25!

Our second-last day on the road was very rainy and it poured all day. We drove until eight in the evening and pulled into a provincial park to camp for the night; we were beat! After we pitched the tent, we cooked up a couple of burgers and hit the sack. A few minutes later the park attendant arrived so we paid him the $5.00 fee and immediately fell asleep.

We Awoke to a Dry Day

SONY DSC

The lake was frozen and we had to break the ice to get ourselves washed up. What a rude awakening! We stopped at a town called Watson Lake where we joined the crowd who were putting up signs from their hometowns and we did the same. We had known about this tourist attraction for many years and had taken an old sign from the lake where my brother’s cottage was back home. I had some nails and did the job.

After five more hours, we knocked on the door of our daughter’s apartment in Whitehorse. It was 11 days since we began the trip. We had only one flat tire when a valve in the wheel gave up.

The Highlight of The Trip

For me, it was the pleasure to have spent it with my wonderful wife, Irma.

She was the perfect companion — cheerful when it was needed. We didn’t have a job and we had about $100 remaining but she never allowed that to creep into her thoughts. Her cheerful disposition during the long, hard days helped us face the future with the knowledge that we would make a new, fresh start and that everything would be just fine. As of this date, November 1, 2017, we find ourselves a few months before our 60th wedding anniversary, and she is still the glue that has held us together.

As The Title of This Blog Says, MY WHAT A RIDE!

16 years experience went into our book.

  • Writing your resume
  • Finding a job
  • Job interview
  • Rental buildings
  • Condominiums
  • Daily routines
  • Waste management
  • Fixing things

Benefits you may receive such as;

  • Rent reduction
  • Working from home
  • Free parking, phones, cable, hydro,
  • Vacations
  • Stat holidays
  • Salaries
  • Dental

Once you have read CARETAKERS you will be ready to hit the job market.

6.99

 

 

 

 

 

Waste Management

Disposing of the household garbage in a private home is quite simple.

On the appointed day, take out the waste container, leave it at the curb, take it back in when empty — what could be simpler?

Waste management is a task every caretaker will be required to do on an ongoing basis.

In the case of a hi-rise tower most, but not all, will have garbage chutes on each floor. Some will have a garbage recycling room where garbage bins are set up and a separate section for recyclables such as paper, cardboard, bottles and cans. Residents will take their waste and place it in the appropriate bins. There may even be a separate area for cardboard. On the collection day, the caretaker will set out the recycling bins at the pickup point or area for the truck to take the contents away. In some cases the cardboard will be picked up by either the contracted truck or by a private disposal truck. Cardboard is worth money and from time to time a local guy with a pickup truck may offer to take it away for free. This is a good idea as nothing but cardboard will be added. If the person proves to be reliable then call him on a regular basis because from time to time you may need to get rid of something out of the ordinary and he may be your man.

Garbage Waste Bins

With a full load, the large waste disposal bins may weigh over a ton. In most cases a small tractor may be available to tow the bins to the collection area; otherwise, the truck driver will roll the bins out to the truck. As the caretaker, you should not try moving these bins by hand as you may seriously injure your back. Be aware of this system before you take the position. You should discuss this with the property manager when you take your pre-acceptance tour. You may have to turn the job down if you have any back issues.

Large Compactor Bins

If the building has garbage chutes on each floor, the household garbage will fall down into the compactor. These bins are large and will be picked up by the truck and taken away to the disposal area in the city. The trucker will place an empty container before he takes the full container away.

The residents will place their garbage bags in the chutes and as it gets to the dumpster, it will trigger the compactor to start a push and that will send the waste into the bin. Sometimes residents will put an overstuffed bag into the chute and it will block the way and stop anything else from coming down. If you are lucky, you may find it early and release it. If no one notices the blockage, it could result in 6 or 10 floors being blocked. This could take a lot of time to clear by way of a hoe or some other tool.

Waste Management and Garbage Recycling

As you can see, waste management is not to be taken lightly. In the winter, snow can be a problem and may block the pickup area stopping the trucks from getting to the bins. British Columbia in Canada has a very active recycling program. Containers of every kind must be placed in the recycling bins.

Old Computers.

Electronic items including televisions, radios, computers and ipads must be taken to special depots for disposal. In a rental complex we once managed, the household appliances were slowly being replaced. The process we followed was to have them picked up and taken to the recycling depot where we would be charged a fee to get rid of them. When we began the job, a room was loaded with these appliances. One day, a fellow showed up at my office and asked if he could take some. I quickly agreed and he paid me for those he took. I have no idea how he could make a profit by taking them off of our hands as he would need to pay the recycling fee and he paid us $20 per item. As you can see, waste disposal is a big part of the job for caretakers.

16 years experience went into our book.

  • Writing your resume
  • Finding a job
  • Job interview
  • Rental buildings
  • Condominiums
  • Daily routines
  • Waste management
  • Fixing things

Benefits you may receive such as;

  • Rent reduction
  • Working from home
  • Free parking, phones, cable, hydro,
  • Vacations
  • Stat holidays
  • Salaries
  • Dental

Once you have read CARETAKERS you will be ready to hit the job market.

6.99

 

 

Employment Benefits

The Best of the Employee Benefits was the Reduced Rent Deal

We were hired to be caretakers in a beautiful condo complex that was under construction. The rents would compare with the rent for rental apartments where a one bedroom would be $950. We were charged $400. Over the years we experienced the same benefit wherever we went. One rental building we managed had a three-bedroom apartment and our cost was only $550 whereas tenants paid $1,600 for the same size.

The reason for this employment benefit is that the landlord realized that our apartment is really part of the business where we had our phones and computer. We actually had a stand-alone office in the building but we were only in the office an hour per day.

Just prior to our first job as caretakers, Irma and I sat for an evening with a caretaker couple who explained the job and pointed out the many benefits the job offered. Overall, it sounded pretty good to us and we actively got busy with our job search. It was later when we took a good look at the employee benefits that our eyes were opened.

The Money Part of the Rent Reduction

In the first job we had, we enjoyed a rental benefit of $550 per month. This was a negotiated figure done by the property manager in conjunction with the government tax office. The benefit totaled a $6,600 saving for us over a year.

More benefits to come

As the company provided the suite for us, they had to have continuity in case we were to leave the job. They provided us with hydro, two phones, a landline, cable and a computer — all at no cost to us!

After three months on the job, we qualified for two weeks of vacation as well as 12 statutory holidays; dental care, and free underground parking — the cost was $25 for the residents.

Working From Home

This employment benefit was an excellent one and saved us plenty of money as well as stress. If you work from home, you don’t need to commute daily — your vehicle lasts longer; tires, engines, lights and brakes wear out at a slower rate, insurance is much cheaper, and you don’t need to replace your vehicle every few years. Working from home is a real health benefit because instead of commuting for a few hours per day, you will be healthier by not feeling that commuter stress. Yet another bonus is that you can exercise while working, and finally, you can fit more into your day with the hours saved from commuting!

CARETAKERS is a book we wrote taking you through our days on the job.

We explain everything you need to know about the job including how to write a resume, find a job, through to leasing a suite in a rental building. We also explain the difference between working as condo caretakers and rental caretakers.

16 years experience went into our book.

  • Writing your resume
  • Finding a job
  • Job interview
  • Rental buildings
  • Condominiums
  • Daily routines
  • Waste management
  • Fixing things

Benefits you may receive such as;

  • Rent reduction
  • Working from home
  • Free parking, phones, cable, hydro,
  • Vacations
  • Stat holidays
  • Salaries
  • Dental

Once you have read CARETAKERS you will be ready to hit the job market.

6.99

 

 

 

Mature Worker Employment Demand

Just how much demand is out there for mature or senior workers?

If you read the headlines these days, you know the demand for skilled, senior, mature workers is almost nonexistent. Most employers want those recent graduates who are eager to learn; but, there is one field of employment that remains at a high and steady rate.

Demand for Caretakers Remains Steady.

When we talk of mature worker employment we tend to forget about the couple who are taking care of your apartment or condo complex while you are at work. Your caretaker is probably a couple who are of middle age — the type of couple who are reliable and make sure that your home buildings are clean and secure. More often than not they spent many years in the workforce as bankers, construction workers, plumbers or in the retail trade. They may have been pushed out of their employment due to their age, health or a number of other reasons. They may have found that mature worker employment demand has led to a shortage in their bank account.

So is there a demand for caretakers?

The demand is there because new apartment and condo complexes are going up all of the time. Take a drive around your city and take note of the number of construction cranes in use. For every building you see, there is a need for a caretaker. Back in the 1990s, we would drive around the city and point out each crane and say, “There is another $35,000 job, and there is another one.” Every building crane meant another good job available!

There are a lot of resources out there today for finding Caretakers jobs. Start with the Employees Wanted section in the newspapers. These ads may be listed under Caretakers, Building Managers or Superintendents.

Another invaluable source for Caretakers jobs is the internet. Workopolis.com and Indeed.com list many jobs available in your area.  Be sure to check out other cities through them as well. Check to see if the job ad states, “will train.”

Caretakers do retire.

Many caretakers get into the business when in their 60s and finally retire once their pensions kick in. If their health is declining, it may be the deciding factor. These events create more caretaker job openings.

Some cities now demand that caretakers be certified. You may be required to take a course as a caretaker. Generally, these courses can be completed in a couple of weeks. The certificate will tell your interviewer you are a qualified candidate for the job at hand. As a mature worker, finding employment in a caretaker position will be a breeze if you are certified.

Where can I learn about the job?

Our book, CARETAKERS, was written to guide you through everything you will need to know to do the job. We explain how to do your resume, find a job, prepare for an interview, fix a leak in a pipe, rent an apartment, work with a strata council, and everything in between.

16 years experience went into our book.

  • Writing your resume
  • Finding a job
  • Job interview
  • Rental buildings
  • Condominiums
  • Daily routines
  • Waste management
  • Fixing things

Benefits you may receive such as;

  • Rent reduction
  • Working from home
  • Free parking, phones, cable, hydro,
  • Vacations
  • Stat holidays
  • Salaries
  • Dental

Once you have read CARETAKERS you will be ready to hit the job market.

6.99

 

Best Retirement Job Ever For Seniors

A good friend of mine had a problem:

His girlfriend shared a single room with her sister in a small apartment building. There was no room for privacy. We served in the Canadian Navy on the same ship. I very reluctantly agreed to his pleas to go to meet his girlfriend’s sister for a date. He was a little nutty and I had reservations. Little did I know this would be the beginning chapter in my life, and hers, covering the next 60 years.

If it wasn’t for that blind date, Irma and I would never have known about the best retirement job ever. In a few words we met, were married a year later, raised four wonderful children and worked terribly hard to make a living. I left the navy and took over my dad’s business only to be wiped out by a fire a couple of years later. My trade as a watchmaker was on a road to oblivion as the digital watch age soon landed upon us. My trade was useless to me.

As the years went by, it became harder to find employment.

By the age of 55, we found ourselves reduced to planting trees for a reforestation outfit. It was tough even for the teenagers who had more stamina than us. I don’t know which was worse — the flies, heat, cold, stumps or rain! We worked really hard and finally, moved as far away as we could go from our home to Whitehorse in Canada’s Yukon Territory.

We bought a machine for cleaning ceilings and walls and managed to make a living. In the late fall, we decided to move to Vancouver for the winter rather than stay in the Yukon as winters are very cold and folks do not clean house until spring.

One day, with the temperature at -25 C and the wind howling, we walked the mile or so to town. To get there, we had to cross a bridge over the Yukon River. We entered the Whitehorse library to get some relief from the cold. I happened to scan the Vancouver newspaper want ads and saw this Ad, Caretakers Wanted and they would provide training! A light went on inside my head: Bingo! Finally, we felt we had found the best retirement job ever! We typed out a simple resume and mailed it out to six companies. We received five replies to come and see them when we arrived in Vancouver — Another bingo!

Now, you probably are not going to believe what we had to do to get there … that is a story in itself!

16 years experience went into our book.

  • Writing your resume
  • Finding a job
  • Job interview
  • Rental buildings
  • Condominiums
  • Daily routines
  • Waste management
  • Fixing things

Benefits you may receive such as;

  • Rent reduction
  • Working from home
  • Free parking, phones, cable, hydro,
  • Vacations
  • Stat holidays
  • Salaries
  • Dental

Once you have read CARETAKERS you will be ready to hit the job market.

6.99